TBA 2019
San Diego, USA

Day One
Wednesday, 30th May, 2018

Day Two
Thursday, 31st May, 2018

Conference Day Two, Thursday, 31st May, 2018

08.00
Breakfast & Networking

08.50
Chair’s Opening Remarks

From Discovery to Market: Current Challenges of Genome Editing using CRISPR & NBTs

09.00
This Little (castration-free) Piggy Went to Market; This Happy Hornless Cow Stayed Home (to produce milk for sale): Bringing Natural NBT Food Animals to Market

Synopsis

  • Overview of the current global landscape for genome-editing products; positions of international regulatory agencies
  • How lack of global regulatory harmonization stifles innovation; impacts commercialization; and harms US producers and global trade competitiveness; Prioritizing market access through NBT-friendly countries
  • FDA vs USDA – finding the right path for gene-edited food animals in the U.S.

09.25
Case Study: The Potential and Pitfalls of Gene Editing in Food Animals

  • Alison Van Eenennaam Animal Biotechnology and Genomics Cooperative Extension Specialist, University of California, Davis

Synopsis

  • Great opportunities exist to use gene editing in food animal breeding programs
  • Commercialization in breeding programs requires the ability to edit many animals at the top of the breeding pyramid
  • Current draft regulatory language introduces considerably uncertainty to developers and has the potential to disincentive both academic research and investment in this field

09.50
Case Study: Management of genome edited materials during product development

  • Jingwen Chen Quality Manager and Global GMO Detection lead, Syngenta

Synopsis

  • Global regulatory review
  • Characterization of genome edited materials
  • Management of edited materials during product development

10.15
Morning Refreshments & Networking

Navigating/Strategizing Consumer Acceptance & Commercialization of CRISPR & NBTs Products

10.45
Beyond Technology: Navigating the Emerging World of CRISPR-Cas Advanced Breeding

Synopsis

  • Taking up regulatory and consumer acceptance challenges
  • Pursuing new product opportunities under the appropriate regulatory paradigm
  • Making the technology broadly accessible

11.10
Building Consumer and Stakeholder Trust in Gene Editing in Agriculture

Synopsis

  • A more complete understanding of the cycle of continuous influence and the need to build support with a broad base of stakeholders
  • The foundational elements of building trust in technology
  • How to apply the trust building model in today’s communication environment?

11.35
Telling the Plant Breeding Innovation Story

  • Jane DeMarchi VP, Government and Regulatory Affairs, American Seed Trade Association (ASTA)

Synopsis

 

  • How we communicate about gene editing will influence if the technology is accepted
  • It is important to talk about gene editing within the context of plant breeding
  • It is important to communicate the health and environmental benefits that can be derived from the use of these tools

12.00
Networking Lunch

Current & Future Regulatory Landscape of CRISPR & NBTs Edited Products

13.00
Keynote: Envisioning the Future of Breeding Innovation in Agriculture: A Perspective for Policy

Synopsis

  • Overview of the Task Force on Rural Prosperity
  • Update on USDA’s efforts to modernize its biotechnology framework
  • Outline of Secretary Perdue’s announcement regarding USDA Statement on Plant Breeding Innovation

13.20
USDA Regulation of Genome Edited Crops: USDA Believes There are Opportunities to Improve Oversight Of GE Crops Through:

  • Neil Hoffman Science Advisor, Regulatory Services , United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)

Synopsis

  • Risk based regulation
  • Excluding from oversight genetic modifications that could otherwise be achieved through conventional breeding
  • Avoiding event by event regulation

USDA regulates organisms with new traits created with GE and not the techniques that made them. USDA is unlikely to exclude classes of techniques from regulation.

13.40
FDA Oversight of Food from Plants Developed with Biotechnology

  • Patrick Cournoyer Consumer Safety Officer - Office of Food Additive Safety, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

Synopsis

  • Food safety requirements enforced by FDA do not discriminate between genetically engineered and traditionally bred plants
  • FDA administers the Plant Biotechnology Consultation Program to help developers ensure food from new plant varieties will be safe and compliant with applicable laws and regulations
  • FDA requested public comment on questions related to genome editing in 2017 and is currently evaluating responses

14.00
The International Regulatory Landscape for Genome Edited Products

Synopsis

  • Policy/regulatory regimes of various countries for genome edited products and how different products have been treated in practice
  • Implications of asynchronous regulatory regimes
  • Global engagement of international community and path forward

14.20
Afternoon Refreshments & Networking

Gene Editing vs. Modification: What the Future of CRISPR & NBTs in Agriculture Hold

15.00
Panel Discussions: Can CRISPR & NBTs Survive/Thrive in a Hostile Global Environment Against GMOs?

  • Fan-Li Chou Biotechnology Coordinator , United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
  • Neil Hoffman Science Advisor, Regulatory Services , United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
  • Patrick Cournoyer Consumer Safety Officer - Office of Food Additive Safety, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)
  • Alison Van Eenennaam Animal Biotechnology and Genomics Cooperative Extension Specialist, University of California, Davis
  • Cory A. Christensen Global Program Leader for Technology, Dow AgroSciences

Synopsis

  • What is the best practice model when there is so much domestic and international regulatory hurdles stopping these product from fully penetrating the market?
  • How much role the consumers are playing in determining the commercial viability of these products?
  • How to develop an adoption and fusion model accepted by regulators and consumers?

15.45
Chair’s Closing Remarks & End of 2nd Annual CRISPR & NBT AgBio Congress 2018